Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

Megabass sponsored pro Chris Zaldain talks anout how he rigs and fishes the 5 inch Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait. The Spark Shad has a keel shape body which keeps the spark shad swimming straight. The T shape of the tail gives the swimbait a true wag when being fished through the water. If a swimbait is not swimming accurately through the water bass will be very reluctant to strike. If the bait is swimming side ways or the tail is not making an traditional motion of a live shad. Chris uses 3 main ways to rig his Megabass Spark Shad.

Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

Megabass Spark Shad Swimbait

The first way is to use a lead headed swimbait jig head. This style has an exposed hook which means it is typically used in most open water situations, going over rocks, and in depths of 10 feet or more of water. The second way is to use a belly weighted head. Used for cover such as standing timber and grass, this way can be presented as weedless and allows the bait to get in and out of the structure without getting snagged. The third way Chris rigs his spark shad is with a vibrating jig trailer. The blade on the front of the jig creates a movement on the water and subtleness of the shad gives it a perfect presentation for the fish to react to.

Chris recommends a stiff rod around 7’0″ to 7’2″ rod to be able to pitch and flip or make long casts with the swimbait. Use a slow retrieve to let these baits do all the work. Typically you will want to point you rod tip towards your bait to give you a 3 to 9 hookset when a bass does strike your bait.

With these different presentations the days on the water when the bass are smashing the shad you should have no problem filling up your live well and giving yourself a new profile picture.

Brian Cornelison

Brian Cornelison

Brian Cornelison is the Content Director and Social Media Manager for Bass Fishing Nation. He enjoys fishing, the outdoors, playing sports, or any thing competitive. Before coming on at BFN he was an Assistant Basketball Coach at Mt. Hood Community College. His competitive nature is what drives him to compete in both Kayak & Boat bass fishing tournaments.
Brian Cornelison

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